Burmese Category

BeautyBurm's Dabl Jazz TekilaThe last few years have seen a lot of changes in the world of Burmese. A new breed was started in America using cats from the UK and Europe – so these were named European Burmese. These cats follow the European standard rather than the American one, and the reds, creams and torties are accepted in this breed, whereas they are not recognised in American Burmese.

Australia, and to a lesser extent, New Zealand, are now large exporters of Burmese cats, not only to Europe, but to America as well.   But perhaps the biggest addition to the Burmese family is the inclusion of cats from Eastern Europe, where they are now extremely popular. Russia, Latvia, Poland, Hungary and Belarus are just some of the countries which are now importing and exporting Burmese throughout the world.

The last twenty years has also seen other cats appear, whose origins were Burmese. Burmillas are now found all over the world having had their birth in England from an unplanned mating between a Burmese queen and a chinchilla male.   Asian cats are also popular, displaying diverse colours and patterns to their coats. Now we have Tiffanies, who are similar to Burmillas, but with longer coats. All these cats are primarily of Burmese type.

BurMau Al SolAmerica saw the emergence of the Bombay – a solid black cat of Burmese type, and then the Tonkinese, which started as a cross between a Burmese and a Siamese.   The Tonkinese are now very popular in America. England has from time to time had black cats of Burmese type from mis-matings, but now the Bombay breed is fully recognised and is a very striking cat. New Zealand started its own breeding programme of silver and patterned Burmese which is growing in popularity.

During the last few years the wheel has turned full circle, as a hybrid female named Mod Daeng was brought from Burma to America. Mod Daeng is of a similar type to Wong Mau and has produced beautiful, healthy kittens.   I am sure we will hear more of Mod Daeng’s offspring as the years progress.

 

History Copyright Rosemary Hale 2012

Photographs are reproduced by kind permission of Robine Pocock, Marina Kabanets and Olesya Kolosova.

Zaing Nga MinNot many years after the first Burmese were imported from America, they started being exported all round the world. It was from Britain, not America, that most countries obtained their first Burmese cats. For this reason most countries based their Standard of Points upon the British one rather than that of America.

Between 1957 and 1958 three males and two females were sent to New Zealand, three males and two females were sent to Australia, then two males and four females were sent to South Africa including Zaing Ngo Min. Also in 1957 two cats to to Ceylon (Sri Lanka) and a further pair to Canada.   By 1970 Australia and New Zealand were importing the newer colours, red and creams, chocolates and lilacs.

From 1957 onwards many cats were exported to Europe. A male and female went to Sweden and a further female to Norway. The 1960s saw further cats arriving in Norway and Denmark, including the newer colours. In 1963 two males and a female went to France, and in 1964 the first cats arrived in The Netherlands. Two females went to Germany in 1969.

During the 1970s onwards cats of all colours continued to be exported around the world, though virtually none were imported in return.

By 1969 Chocolate (Champagne) Burmese were beginning to be more widely seen in America and two breeders in the UK decided to import this new colour. Moira Mack (Belcanto Burmese) and Iona Beckett of the Morningstar prefix, discovered that they were both trying to locate suitable cats. Eventually the managed to locate two unrelated kittens, a male, Jo-Dee’s Golden Morningstar, and a female, Jo-Dee’s Belcanto Norma. Unfortunately, the quarantine regulations had, at this time, been lengthened from 6 to 12 months, so the pair produced two litters of kittens whilst still in quarantine, the first chocolate kittens to be born in the UK.

Ramree Kepala SusuAbout the same time two other breeders had also made the decision to import chocolate kittens. Elizabeth Caldicott (Ramree) and Pam Evely (Kernow) imported four cats. Two were chocolate, a male, Aybo Budda, and a female, Kari Simone. The other two were brown cats carrying the chocolate gene, Suda Sirrocco Simon and Kimboh Kyeema.   Aybo Budda and Kari Simone had four chocolate females in their first litter, one of whom was Ramree Judi, who, when mated back to her sire, produced the first lilac (platinum) Burmese, Sabra Honeymist Will.   Judi’s litter sister, Ramree Mata Mas, was also mated back to Aybo Budda and she, too, produced a lilac kitten Sittang Sylvan Surprise.

By 1972 the chocolates and lilacs were well established and it was decided to embark on a breeding programme to introduce the chocolate gene into the Reds and Creams. Brown and blue torties were already recognised, and in 1973 the first lilac tortie, Ramree Kepala Susu, was born. But it was not until 1976 that the elusive chocolate tortie, Kaboobi Isabelle, made an appearance. The ten colours of Burmese as we know them today were now complete.

Not many years after the first Burmese were imported from America, they started being exported all round the world. It was from Britain, not America, that most countries obtained their first Burmese cats. For this reason most countries based their Standard of Points upon the British one rather than that of America.

Between 1957 and 1958 five cats ( all brown) were sent to New Zealand, three males and two females.   Australia imported a brown pair in 1957, and a further three browns in 1962. South Africa imported five brown cats between 1957 and 1958. A pair went to Ceylon (Sri Lanka) in 1957 and three cats went to Canada in the same year. By 1970 Australia and New Zealand were importing the newer colours, red and creams, chocolates and lilacs.

From 1957 onwards many cats were exported to Europe. The first cats went to Scandanavia in 1957 and by the 1960s cats of most colours had been exported to Germany, The Netherlands and France.

 

 

 

 

Pussinboots Pagan's PrideIn 1963 Pussinboots True Pegu, escaped whilst on call. She was mated by a red tabby shorthair and the resultant litter contained a black-tortie kitten. Robine Pocock, Pegu’s breeder, decided to embark on a breeding programme in the hopes of producing new colours in the Burmese breed. The kitten, named Wavermouse Galapagos, was mated to Soondar Mooni, and from the mating another black-tortie kitten was kept, called Pussinboots Pagan’s Pride. She produced two red males who would be very important in the new breeding programme, Gogmagog Golden Guinea and Kipushi Tiki. To widen the gene pool two unrelated matings took place. Chevening Susy, a tortie and white female carrying the siamese gene was mated to Soondar Mooni to produce a red male, Chevening Meringue, and Arboreal Fenella, a brown female, was mated to Southview Havoc, a Redpoint Siamese, and produced two tortie females, Kudos Farrago and Kudos Fantasia. Kudos Blue Bonnetia, a daughter of Kudos Farrago, produced the first cream kitten when mated to Robine’s Buskins Blue Sunya. This kitten was Kudos Gold Guinea, so named because the coat on his tummy was spotted.

There was a problem with residual barring in the kittens from the early matings. Joyce Dell (Kupro Burmese) decided to mate her blue tortie female, Kupro Silken Sophina, to a blue male, Kathoodu Sapphire Kilvi, and realised that this mating was clearing the coats. By the end of the 1960s Joyce had produced a long line of bar-free cream kittens, the most famous being Gr Ch Kupro Cream Rama.